Ostrow Mazowiecka    OMRF 2013
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Breaking news:

 

The Ostrów Mazowiecka Yizkor Book is now in print and can be purchased in English translation. It can also be read online on the JewishGen Yizkor Book Project website.

Information about the following towns is also included: Andrzejewo, Bialystok, Brok, Ciechanowiec, Czyzewo, Dlugosiodlo, Goworowo, Komorowo, Kosow-Lacki, Lomza, Malkinia, Nowogrod, Nur, Ostrolęka, Poreba, Pultusk, Rozan, Siedlce, Slonim, Sokolow-Podlaski, Szumowo, Tykocin, Warszawa, Wąsewo, Wysokie Mazowieckie, Wyszkow, Zambrow, and Zareby Koscielne.
A copy of the book has been donated to the Library at the new Museum for the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw.


   
The Case of Jadwiga Dlugoborska: In Search of Jews Who Were Hidden in the Ostrow Mazowiecka Wersal Hotel
Magdalena Gawin tells the little-known story of her aunt Jadwiga Długoborska, who hid a number of Jews in the Wersal Hotel in Ostrow-Mazowiecka after the November 1939 massacre. In 1944 Jadwiga was arrested, tortured and killed by the Gestapo. Her niece is searching for survivors who were hidden in the hotel. Read more about this story.

 

Ostrów Mazowiecka Cemetery Restoration and Memorial Project. Read more.
 

 

Ostrów Mazowiecka

Ostrów Mazowiecka (commonly called “Ostroveh” by the Jewish inhabitants) is 92 kilometers (57 miles) northeast of Warsaw, on the Grzybowka River and along the main highways from Warsaw up to the towns of Lomza, Zambrow, Bialystok and beyond.

According to Encyclopedia Judaica, those who succeeded in settling in Ostrow came mostly from central Poland and Lithuania, and as a result they developed a special Yiddish dialect combining the characteristics of both areas. The dialect more closely resembles the northern, Lithuanian pronunciations, suggesting that the influence from that region was stronger, an observation also made by a 1995 local history of the town. ...excerpt by Michael Richman

View Ostrów Mazowiecka via MapQuest 52°48´ N, 21°54´ E, or view a variety of maps through link at left. For information about Ostrów Mazowiecka today, view the city's website at www.ostrowmaz.pl.

Family Tree of Jewish Ostrów Mazowiecka on the eve of the Holocaust

Read about the exciting project to document all the Jews of Ostrów Mazowiecka on the eve of the Holocaust. The project was formally launched at the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy at the New York City Marriott Marquis Hotel, August 2006. Read about the project here.

An article about this project appeared in a local Ostrów Mazowiecka newspaper on May 20, 2008. Click here to see a translation of the Polish newspaper article.

Michael Richman and the Ostrów Mazowiecka Research Family

Read about one man's quest to find his family's history in Ostrów Mazowiecka and surrounding towns. Click here.

Searchable Databases

* Find others researching Ostrów Mazowiecka! Search the JewishGen Family Finder.


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